Author Topic: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon  (Read 2486 times)

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Offline Gossamer

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #45 on: August 21, 2017, 10:48:29 am »
Thanks.
Looking good.
All the right bits, but not necessarily in the right order.

Offline 94mharris

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #46 on: August 21, 2017, 01:01:06 pm »
Looking really smart. Gonna sound great once you get the 6 pot going :) fnky
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Offline PCB93

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #47 on: August 22, 2017, 08:46:46 pm »
Tiny update - the air cleaner has been lurking in the garage since October, so that's had a go-over in addition to the parts I removed recently.

Before:


After:


I've decided recently that in contrast to the Series III, which was predominantly roller and brush-painted, absolutely everything on the Carawagon is going to be sprayed; I'm aiming for as close to 'pristine' as possible. Sorry, 'patina' people! Fear not, however - that certainly won't prevent it being using properly, come the time.

Would my pile of photographs still potentially be of use, Gossamer, or have things progressed with your own vehicle in the time I've been absent? I was going to sort through them properly, but will be happy to just indiscriminately lob them all into a Flickr album this week if they'd be any good to you.

Phil
« Last Edit: April 21, 2019, 07:49:13 pm by PCB93 »
1979 Series III 88" Hard-top - daily drive
1968 Series IIA 109" Carawagon - project

Offline PCB93

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #48 on: August 22, 2017, 09:32:53 pm »
All previous posts in this thread now 'de-Photobucketed' and displaying correctly.

Phil
1979 Series III 88" Hard-top - daily drive
1968 Series IIA 109" Carawagon - project

Offline Gossamer

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #49 on: August 22, 2017, 10:20:15 pm »
All photo's and comments/advice will be gratefully received.

Sproggle's 109 is still roughly where we left it in the spring.
All the right bits, but not necessarily in the right order.

Offline PCB93

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #50 on: September 20, 2017, 08:13:42 pm »
Flickr album is finally sorted - I've included every photo I have that shows some aspect of the camper conversion. The mechanical side of things I have omitted to save upload space. Obviously, all of that is standard IIA, so can be found in the usual manuals anyway.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/150923949@N04/8hr0v6

It's not terribly thorough yet, but will be added to as I go along. If anyone would like extra/more detailed photos or measurements of anything in particular, let me know, and I'll see what I can get next time I'm over there.

Phil
« Last Edit: October 05, 2017, 10:21:04 pm by PCB93 »
1979 Series III 88" Hard-top - daily drive
1968 Series IIA 109" Carawagon - project

Offline PCB93

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #51 on: October 06, 2017, 12:23:13 am »
A little more progress, then - actually from mid-September, but I've only just found the time to write it up. I've recently gone into my final year of university, so things are a tad 'ectic at present.

The valve stem seal conundrum was finally solved by Calum (who else?) during my brief appearance at t'pit. It turned out that the head had somehow been fitted with two sets of seals, so there was still a set in there even after I removed the first lot last October. How anyone managed to squeeze the second set in, I'll never know. I can't help but be rather embarrassed about missing that, but never mind - it's certainly not a mistake I'll be making again! Ten minutes with a pick and a matchstick (to prod the new seals in), and that was that. Thanks to turbo mick for the use of his tail-gate as an impromptu work-bench!

A bit more dismantlement took place before doing anything with the head. As previously mentioned, the clutch hydraulics are up for renewal, and I've concluded that access to the slave cylinder will be much easier with the gearbox tunnel out.

The heater needed removing first - secured by four screws, the top two of which are shared with the instrument panel. The holes for these are visible below:


The heater wires needed disconnecting from behind the dash, so I decided to have a quick look behind there while it was off. The wiring looks less bodged and generally terrifying than that in the rest of the vehicle:


Following that, the heater just needed sliding out until the inlet and outlet pipes were clear of the bulkhead - visible here on the engine bay side:


Heater removed:


Following the removal of a few screws, the vinyl trim whatnot came away to reveal the gearbox tunnel to bulkhead fixings:


The six-pot gearbox tunnel arrangement differs from the four-cylinder version in that it sits on top of the two floor panels instead of beneath them, so it is, in theory, quicker to remove. I quickly encountered some thoroughly seized bolts, however, so thought 'bugger that for now' and moved on to the engine bay.

As I exited the cab, the driver's door top hinge broke, leaving the door just about clinging on:


Both top hinges are of the Series III type, as the previous owner decided to fit boingy mirrors. Thankfully he had the sense to keep hold of the original IIA ones - they'll be going back on pretty promptly.

I thought it would be sensible to check there was nothing potentially harmful residing in the sump, so that came off, with pleasing ease:


Some serious 'fun' I've had cleaning that up. The oil filter housing and adaptor were removed too.

View of the crankshaft and engine block interior. I'm intrigued by the pale yellow paint colour - never seen that before. Is anyone familiar with it?:


Oil strainer also came off for a clean. It's held in place by a small castle nut and split pin:


Back home then - inlet valves finally going back into the head. The engine at the left of the photo is a straight-six from a Rover P4 105 - its head takes twin SUs, and may well find its way into the Carawagon, eventually:


Rockers back in:


The most drawn-out head re-build in the history of mankind, finally complete:


Various brackets re-fitted:


It's important to remember the o-ring for the water pump connection:


Head dropped back on. I enjoy the colour contrast with the still sludge-coated block:


That pretty well brings things up to date. The clutch pedal box, sump, and oil filter housing are currently in the process of being tidied-up, so once they're done I'll find a free weekend to throw everything back together, set the valve clearances etc., and see what, if anything, happens when I turn the key.

Phil
1979 Series III 88" Hard-top - daily drive
1968 Series IIA 109" Carawagon - project

Offline Lo-Fi

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #52 on: October 07, 2017, 10:41:18 pm »
Nice progress! Can't help chuckling at the valve stem seals...
I've just torn down a Rover P4 block, which is supposedly the same. Familiar internal paint (in the valve chest too), but the crank webs and main caps look very different. I've still got my Land Rover block to dismantle, so it'll be interesting to see what the differences are side by side.
Good luck with firing it up.

Ian

Offline PCB93

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #53 on: December 19, 2017, 01:42:07 am »
Thanks Ian - it looks like the yellow paint was standard for many P4 six-pots, as I've found a couple of brochure illustrations showing the same colour. Never seen one this colour in a Land Rover before - think they're usually blue-grey. I've had a read of your own IIA thread - the P4 block you stripped looks to be an earlier 2,638cc type, as opposed to the 2,625cc version used in 109"s. If so, this likely accounts for the dissimilar crank etc. Calum will no doubt have something to say if I'm incorrect, however! Must say, I wish I had your fabrication skills - Pete was spot-on in saying the SW is in the best possible hands. I can think of a certain Carawagon about which the same definitely cannot be said!


The aforementioned brochure illustrations, for reference:

Rover 90 2,638cc engine (image found here: http://home.ican.net/~magnet/p4/engine1.jpg):


Rover 110 2,625cc 'Weslake' engine. Unusually the head is shown painted too. (image found here: https://i.pinimg.com/736x/8c/8b/39/8c8b39772482f02d07a097a048915144--brochure-html.jpg):



No progress to report on the Carawagon front, sadly - it's still at the point I left it in September. My sporadic workshop sessions have lately been dedicated to getting a mate's Series III back on the road after dropping a valve. It's been one of those affairs where you begin taking things apart only to find layer-upon-layer of other problems. I'm sure we've all been there!


What I have got are some photographs from a couple of owners back - they're from around 1990, on the Isle of Wight. Corrosion aside, not a lot appears to have changed since then - the addition of the LPG system, and replacement of what looks like a cubby-box with a centre seat are the only particularly noticeable things.















That's those, then - with a bit of luck, I may actually get something done again over Christmas!

Phil
1979 Series III 88" Hard-top - daily drive
1968 Series IIA 109" Carawagon - project
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Offline Land Raver

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #54 on: December 19, 2017, 09:51:08 pm »
Nice photos!

Offline James109

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #55 on: December 20, 2017, 08:10:47 am »
Really like those photos, there's something about photos on film! The wagon looks like it was well loved then too!

Offline PCB93

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #56 on: May 26, 2018, 08:03:34 am »
Morning all,

Following the usual long period of inactivity, a modicum of progress has occurred - mostly in the form of a distributor re-build. I'd never done one before, so it was an educational experience for me, at least. This will likely be a rather long post, in which very little actually happens - the Star Wars: The Jast Jedi of Land Rover forum posts, if you like. Moderately more exciting updates may follow in the coming days.

Distributor as removed, less cap, rotor arm (which was cracked), and vacuum unit. Lucas model no. 41227A, June 1968 date-stamp:


Internal gubbins: contact breaker points, condenser and LT lead:


Internal gubbins removed, aside from the rather sorry-looking wire at the bottom of the photo, which I assume is an earth:


Contact breaker moving plate and base plate removed to reveal the centrifugal advance unit:


Once the two springs are removed, along with the screw retaining the cam, the cam can be lifted out (noting the position of the rotor arm slot relative to the distributor driving dog) to reveal the action plate, which sounds tremendously exciting:


Centrifugal advance weights shown at the opposite extremes of their travel:


Next to be removed are the driving dog and thrust washer, requiring this locating pin to be driven out:


The main distributor shaft can then be pressed (or driven) out:


Shaft and action plate removed:


A plastic distance collar sits on the shaft below the action plate:


All parts were then given a good going-over with a brass brush before being, in an unprecedented moment of organisation, placed in a box for re-assembly the following day:


Earth lead replaced, with a bit of the original loom from my Series III (for the screen-wash motor, I think!):


Distributor shaft being pressed back into place, following a liberal smear of moly grease:


Driving dog and thrust washer re-fitted:


Cam and centrifugal advance unit back in place, weight contact surfaces also smeared with moly grease:


Base and contact breaker moving plates re-fitted. The little post down at the right is where the vacuum advance spring attaches:


LT lead re-fitted, alongside new points and condenser. Yes, I do have a safety pin in place of a missing button on my shirt:


The adjusting nut for the vacuum unit is kept at the correct setting by a coil spring and a small leaf spring, which has a central bump to allow it act as a ratchet:


Vacuum unit and rotor arm fitted:


Cap clamps and cap fitted:


Clamping plate fitted; just about ready to go (needs an o-ring in the groove below the clamping plate). For interest I've paired it with the distributor from a 1958 Rover P4 105 (from which I have the engine). Rather a reduction in size appears to have occurred in the intervening ten years:


With that complete, I now know what the inside of a distributor looks like, but still can't really say how most of it works - centrifugal advance and vacuum units especially. Some reading required!


Now over to the garage where the Carawagon is currently stored. I've been slowly adding boxes of refurbished parts. No idea how I came by the Marks and Spencer one - I'm nowhere near posh enough to shop there:


Unfortunately, the main aim of my visit was not actually to make any progress, but to remove the overdrive, which I'm temporarily loaning to the Series III while its own is re-built. The latter, after three years of near total silence, has recently decided not only to do its best Ju-87 'Stuka' impression, but also to rattle loudly once warm, which is a tad concerning.

So here we are - nice and sludgy:


Thought I'd look for the gearbox number while I was in there. Looks good for being the original, to the best of my knowledge:


Mostly came away no trouble. The only exception was the pin linking the lever link-rod to the selector shaft, whose split-pin was rusted fast and required filing level on both sides:


Overdrive coupling sleeve revealed:


Removing that took rather a lot longer than it ought to have done, as the clutch slave cylinder was seized in the dis-engaged position, leaving the gearbox mainshaft spinning freely. Much faffing later, I discovered that the clutch could be engaged by levering a crow-bar against the front prop-shaft and clutch actuating lever to push the slave cylinder back into place. The mainshaft nut then unscrewed easily, allowing the overdrive coupling sleeve to slide out.


While in the cab, I noticed this faint pencil writing on the dash: '96 Radio Solent.' Presumably the owner's local station from its days on the Isle of Wight!:



Now for a tiny bit of progress. Engine oil strainer re-fitted:


Sump ready to go on, now free of the half-inch depth of grey gunge it arrived with:


Sump fitted. Strangely, the two bolts into the bottom of the timing cover are UNC, while the rest are UNF:


Probably its first new oil filter since 2004:


Oil filter housing fitted:


A load of 20W/50 was lobbed in, before wrapping-up for the day. Heading over again this morning to sort tappet clearances etc. With a bit of luck, it might just be running soon. I said that in 2016, however!

Phil
1979 Series III 88" Hard-top - daily drive
1968 Series IIA 109" Carawagon - project

Offline Gossamer

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #57 on: May 26, 2018, 10:02:24 am »
Very clever, well done.

I was chuffed to put a battery on charge this morning.

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Offline Lo-Fi

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #58 on: May 27, 2018, 11:16:24 pm »
Lovely write up! I've just rebuilt my six pot dizzy - same model. I'd highly recommend throwing the points in the bin (where they belong IMHO!) and fitting a Powerspark electronic kit, though. I've been running one in my V8 for many years now, and just put one on the six pot. I'll never go back to mechanical points, short of some kind of thermonuclear apocalypse that destroys everything electronic.

Keep the updates coming!
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Offline PCB93

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Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
« Reply #59 on: November 24, 2018, 12:40:06 am »
As usual, I've been unable to put much work into the Carawagon in recent months, but I'll bring this thread up to date with what little has occurred.

Ian: I'm with you on the Powerspark front - I just bunged some new points in there to get things going for the time being, as there were multiple new sets in a toolbox that came with the vehicle. I put a Powerspark kit on the 2.5 in my 88" some time ago, and it's been very much a 'fit and forget' affair.  Any progress to report with your own six-pot? We appear to be similarly sporadic with our updates!

Next up on the far-longer-than-hoped-for road to getting the engine running was a carburettor rebuild. I'll run through this in far less detail than the distributor, in an attempt to avoid being monumentally dull. I do have photographs of practically every stage of the operation, so on the off chance anyone needs to see anything in particular, feel free to let me know. The carb. in question is a Zenith-Stromberg 175CD-2S, which I believe is standard for Land Rover six-pots. I was initially unsure about this, as there's a note in the history file describing a chance encounter between the 9th (then current) and 2nd owners: 'He (2nd owner) put the Stromberg carb on - 25mpg on the road, 15mpg round town!' I'll believe those figures when I see them! There's no mention of what the Stromberg supposedly replaced, unfortunately.

Anyway, here's the fellow in question in as-removed state:


Removal of the top cover reveals a rubber diaphragm, piston and piston return spring, all of which can be lifted out:


Float chamber removed. Whoever was in there last had refitted the floats upside-down, oddly:


The aluminium body parts all cleaned up quite nicely, though I wasn't too fussy. As usual, clearing the crud from everything was by far the most time-consuming job in the rebuild:


Having cleaned and inspected everything, I was pleased to conclude that nothing needed replacing beyond the gaskets and a few screws. New genuine gasket sets are still readily available:


Cold start assembly going back together. Interestingly, this has two settings, one each for starting above and below -18C. Antarctic expedition, anyone?:


Steel levers etc. refitted after painting. Originally these were anodised, however this had worn through and they had begun to rust:


New stainless screws for the top cover and float chamber - the originals had worn heads from previous work. These are from Ebay, sold as being for a Sunbeam Alpine:


Floats refitted the correct way up!:


New diaphragm. Locating tabs on the underside keep the piston in the correct orientation once fitted:


Adjusting the main jet to avoid interference with the metering needle allows the piston to return smoothly:


Complete carb. ready to go again. Another small step closer:



Now briefly over to the rest of the vehicle! Tappet adjustment on the cards:


Inlet valves are of the overhead type, so sorting these was a familiar process - just 'rule of seven' rather than 'rule of nine' as on a four-cylinder engine:


Side exhaust valves were a new one for me, but the process is essentially the same. Just a bit more faff involved in keeping a screwdriver in place on the adjusting screws, especially on the rear cylinders:


I left with the engine bay looking like this - rocker covers and exhaust manifold refitted:


That brings things up to date then. Just the distributor, carb. and a fuel pump to go on, then hopefully I'll have some more exciting news!

Phil
1979 Series III 88" Hard-top - daily drive
1968 Series IIA 109" Carawagon - project