The Old Land Rover Arms

Landrover stuff => The Landrover Gallery => Topic started by: PCB93 on October 18, 2016, 04:38:11 am

Title: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 18, 2016, 04:38:11 am
Morning all,

This is the new project, then - a Series IIA 109" Carawagon with the six-cylinder petrol engine. Whereas I turned the Series III around in a year, this is going to be more of a long-haul job. I'd been after a Carawagon for a couple of years and this was the first to come up with the spec I was ideally looking for  - cost rather more than I hoped at auction, but given that the plan is to keep and use it for the long run, I'm telling myself that that won't matter too much in the grand scheme of things!

Currently it falls into the 'derelict' category - prior to being trailered home, it hadn't moved from under a tree for eleven years and had an ecosystem of its own. It rolls without any worrying noises, and the engine turns by hand, but that's about all I can say for it at present. The bulkhead needs the usual footwells etc., but is solid in the main. I haven't had a proper look over the chassis yet, but early impressions are that a new one may well be the sensible option. The driver and passenger seats need re-covering, probably along with the main bench seat/bed. The cupboards are in good nick, and the canvas beds in the roof are okay too - I've tested them and they're holding up fine - surprisingly comfortable, too! Unfortunately the original stove is missing. Wiring looks like being the worst job once again - it's been done really badly in the past and there are block connectors everywhere. Much of it is held in place by duct tape. There's also an LPG system that hasn't been used since at least 1998 - that'll be going.

Anyway, photographs.

Arriving in the tipping down rain, which naturally stopped the instant we'd finished unloading:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4368/36572449142_fe038e0210_b.jpg)

Engine bay looks fairly chaotic, with all sorts of aftermarket electrics. Help. Note LPG vaporiser:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4384/36572448562_13e326764d_b.jpg)

Flora and fauna:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4354/36572447752_c455c60930_b.jpg)

Roof still lifts okay, albeit with much creaking:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4405/36346154770_c23a4f0d0a_b.jpg)

Looking a touch happier about life post-jet-wash:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4418/35932742413_eeb5a2622d_b.jpg)

I believe the metal strips on the bonnet and wing-tops are original and once retained rubber matting of some sort:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4437/36953930620_b3f1f81e4e_c.jpg)

Left things to air for a while - cable is for a de-humidifier. Attracted some funny looks from passers-by:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4416/36572444512_89d0b33af0_b.jpg)

Main roof section still looks quite tidy inside:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4429/36742181575_7e7a3bde1d_b.jpg)

Wooden side panels are badly rotted. They look straightforward enough to replace, however:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4355/35932757343_96484cebe5_b.jpg)

Perspex roof windows are quite 'cloudy':
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4386/35907866554_16411c77af_b.jpg)

Hand-pumped tap works fine still:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4335/35932755593_247843547d_b.jpg)

Roof-rack is original, I think. Plan is to replace the wooden parts and retain:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4400/36346160150_1468398e32_b.jpg)

Gearbox with standard sludge coating. Unsure when the overdrive was fitted:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4349/35907865084_ed6047c2b4_b.jpg)

Both wings have some filler which is cracking. Otherwise, panels are pretty straight:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4336/35932753373_b16aed5af7_c.jpg)

Carawagon badges are faded, but legible:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4362/35932752663_3208377a41_b.jpg)

Electric hook-up where the fuel filler should be. Currently there is a military type under-seat fill tank:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4347/35932752043_fb360a62b6_c.jpg)

Pull-out awning support above the rear door. Haven't got it to budge yet:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4374/36742190145_a76410c721_b.jpg)

Paint is worn through to the metal in places:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4352/35907862394_b0a3ac5a77_b.jpg)

Looks almost usable from this angle!:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4413/36742189305_f5cb243399_b.jpg)

Dash is mostly quite tidy, front seats less so:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4373/35907861374_35a81e2e17_b.jpg)

Interior with roof down. Mostly in good order:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4361/35907860904_9f683ae537_c.jpg)

My initial plan is to re-build the top end of the engine and hopefully get it running again - I'll have a look at the state of the bores while I'm at it. If that goes well, the clutch hydraulics will be up next to see if it will move under its own steam. I can't finance a full re-build yet, so for now it'll be a case of removing and refurbishing what I can, to hopefully make the main job quicker when it comes. This is my first IIA, so I'll have quite a few questions in terms of what's standard/original, and what isn't, before we even get to the Carawagon conversion. It's going to be a few years, but I'll keep you all posted!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: moomoo on October 18, 2016, 06:21:19 am
A lot of work bud, but what a prize.
Fantastic. lkebtn
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Horace109 on October 18, 2016, 09:09:16 am
 lkebtn
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Marque on October 18, 2016, 09:28:16 am
I am very happy for you. Another one gone to a safe pair of hands.

M
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Big Rich on October 18, 2016, 10:33:53 am
What a fantastic project. Its looks quite good cleaned up.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: 94mharris on October 18, 2016, 02:09:31 pm
Wow!! Great project  drll Looking forward to future updates, will look forward to seeing it at t'pit in a year or so ...,
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: frecko on October 18, 2016, 04:07:13 pm
Looking forward to seeing this, let me know if you need a hand mate
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Gossamer on October 18, 2016, 06:37:58 pm
I am very envious of your new prize.

 whoo

Good luck with it.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: RMS on October 18, 2016, 07:38:50 pm
A great project - that will be the one from Joslyn/Patina, I think, isn't it?

Let me know if you want any help on the Carawagon side of things - I've restored one or two   whstle  and have another couple waiting for restoration when I get the time.

Oh, and have a look at the LRCC forum HERE (http://www.lrcc.org.uk) - more specific for camper conversions   wdesmle

Cheers,
Robin.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Calum on October 18, 2016, 08:35:03 pm
Looks pretty much identical to mine! The as-found condition looks awfully familiar too!!
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Nuggs on October 18, 2016, 08:48:39 pm
Derelict ......ha. I'll see your 6pot and raise you a stage 1........re defining the word derelict.

Getting quite common these ivory carawagons .  ;D

Looks good though.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Land Raver on October 18, 2016, 10:22:47 pm
Lovely project. I don't think I'll ever be brave enough to take on a Carawagon with a 6 pot but I absolutely love them.
Well done fella - looking forward to reading progress.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: blenky on October 19, 2016, 07:39:18 pm
love it. hope it goes well and look forward to seeing the progress.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: espacekiller on October 19, 2016, 10:44:19 pm
 lkebtn very nice.....well it will be.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 20, 2016, 09:14:11 pm
Thanks all for the positive comments - I'll keep everyone updated.

Robin: it's the Joslyn one, yes - price went higher than I thought it was worth, really, but as I say - sod it, it's mine for good now! I keep meaning to get on the LRCC forum but think I'll end up duplicating posts - perhaps I'll use this forum for the standard mechanical side and LRCC for the Carawagon-specific bits.

Calum: I've seen quite a bit of your Carawagon from looking around on other fora, and thought that my photos might give you a sense of Déjà vu! I was shown around yours by your other half (Alex?) at t'Pit a couple of years ago - if I can get this to anywhere near the same standard, then I'll be happy!

Nuggs: if you're trying to salvage something that is more 'derelict' than this, then I can't say I envy you!


First update, then - had a few hours in the garage on Tuesday evening and got as far as removing the cylinder head. Some more photos, and a few questions:

Both dumb irons are fecked. Rest of the front half of the chassis actually looks good, though - haven't been properly under the rear yet, but fingers crossed:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4350/36572280512_812ee6b783_b.jpg)

Knackered springs - hardly a surprise, and would have replaced anyway:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4429/36572281592_a07c1aae00_b.jpg)

Driver's footwell. Neither the accelerator or clutch pedal will move. Brake pedal is free, and actually firms up on the second pump:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4332/36694937856_2b27c7b7a9_b.jpg)

Passenger footwell. Both are actually much better than my Series III ones were - any truth in the 'British Leyland cheap steel' theory?
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4433/36694939276_e909c547f0_b.jpg)

Door tops are dead:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4385/36346023380_630f1d5dee_b.jpg)

All but one of the original blinds are present - very brittle though, so will make new ones:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4419/36694936636_fb43b60506_b.jpg)

Original seat-belts. They're in good nick, so will probably be staying:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4433/36694938516_ffeae1b77c_c.jpg)

Modern mains electrical socket - that's not staying:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4385/35907736924_0e49fe3692_b.jpg)


Once I'd finished mooching around, I moved on to the engine top end strip-down. Everything came apart much more easily than expected - the joys of an ally head, I suppose. I drained off a couple of gallons of coolant - still the correct blue colour, which was nice. Some water did pour out of the head as I lifted it clear - should I have expected this? Revealed were six rather sooty-looking pistons. The bores look better than those in the Series III did, with no visible scoring. I can feel a distinct ridge where the top ring stops in each cylinder, however - re-bore territory? Mileage is 62,000.

LPG fuel inlet thingy, sits between air inlet and carb. Assume I just omit this when re-assembling (LPG system is going)?:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4342/36694935506_4345ca1458_b.jpg)

Why are there two temperature senders?:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4343/36694934926_ca4066af4c_b.jpg)

Spark plugs were mingin':
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4333/35907734674_111eaa3988_b.jpg)

Sooty pistons. I imagine they're hard to get hold of if it's a re-bore job:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4380/36572286592_d80bb6be4a_b.jpg)

Can anyone advise what these brown exhaust valve deposits are?:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4336/36572287842_6f7f8a607d_b.jpg)


Thanks in advance if anyone can help with some of my queries! There should be more updates to follow as I find my way around.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: B20wnx on October 20, 2016, 10:41:21 pm
Looks good Phil especially after a spit and polish
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Samc88 on October 22, 2016, 12:01:32 pm
The second temp sender may have gone to a seperate temperature gauge. When i fitted my gauge from autometer i had to put in a seperate sender
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: RMS on October 22, 2016, 07:24:29 pm
The sender with three bolts is an Otter switch.

Used in conjunction with a special choke cable which has a switch in line, it makes a contact when the engine warms up and lights a bulb in the dash to remind you to push the choke in.

Hope that helps.

Cheers,
Robin.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Calum on October 22, 2016, 08:10:28 pm
Inside the engine looks good, carbon deposits are good in a 6 pot... means it hasn't been running too lean!! Might not need a rebore, I think mine did at just under 90k but it wasn't too badly worn. Only way is to measure it and see! I'll be following this thread with great interest! It all looks far too familiar!
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 23, 2016, 11:51:38 pm
Thanks chaps.

Samc: I went on to find a third temperature sender, which I think is for the Kenlowe fan that's currently fitted. I knew these two were original though, as they are referenced in the 'Green Bible' - forgot to mention that!

Robin: Got you - thanks. I hadn't seen this set-up before, as the 2.5 petrol in my Series III has only the one sender by the thermostat - the head doesn't have anywhere to accommodate an Otter switch, so I assume they must have been phased out by the time 90/110 production began.

Calum: Thanks, that's reassuring! I've had a read around and it seems that the brown exhaust valve deposits are also indicative of correct mixture, along with low oil consumption. All seems promising. I've completely stripped the head now, and the two inlet rocker shafts have what to me seems very little scoring. Valves look good too. I'll get some photos on fairly soon, though, as multiple opinions are always good!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 25, 2016, 05:52:12 am
Right then, inlet valve gear. Rocker shafts are worse than I originally thought, but by no means terrible. There is scoring where each rocker sits - just about detectable by touch if I run a fingertip over them. Can't see anything untoward with any of the bushes. The dull sections on the shafts are where they are bolted into the head, so there are no moving parts to smooth the original surface:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4348/36602677051_cc89ca6e3c_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/4428/36602675801_695b16c6c2_b.jpg)

Valves all came out in this sort of condition - no signs of pitting, just the usual carbon build-up:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4362/36602678761_aa33bfc72c_b.jpg)

This is only the second engine I've worked on, so I'm far from an 'expert' - any other opinions appreciated. Photos aren't brilliant, so apologies for that.


A few more general photos now. There are quite a few of these aftermarket 'Hella' lamps around - six in the back and one under the bonnet. I have a VW mate who reckons they're 1970s, though I'm unsure when they were fitted. The crappy wiring job was done somewhere around 1990 though, so then may be the best bet:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4439/36694786896_d5a366b4b1_c.jpg)

Ammeter and additional temperature gauge - don't look original, but correct me if I'm wrong:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4333/36602688391_5c5c485cf7_c.jpg)

Left-hand cupboard (allegedly a wardrobe?) with contents as found. Orange lead is for the mains socket:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4421/36572080162_326472c6f1_c.jpg)

Centre cupboard with shelving, plus free pans and camp blanket. A cutlery tray slides out at the top:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4364/36741895535_400fb03c41_b.jpg)

Cupboard door slots into notches to become a table. Only worked this out today:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4433/36572078622_4488ce6709_b.jpg)

Right-hand cupboard with water containers and washing-up bowl 'sink':
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4437/36741894505_da85fc65bf_c.jpg)

Some warping to the top plies of the cupboard nearest the rear door. No other apparent damage to units:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4363/36694804336_a9f40d7e86_c.jpg)

Main bench seat/bed. Needs a good clean before I decide what to do next. There are a few scruffy repairs and splits along the seams:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4345/35907589254_a1a7d2698e_b.jpg)

Original stove is absent - mark on the rear door card suggests it was the fold-down type:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4405/36694804806_c42329730e_b.jpg)

Gap in the floor covering makes it look like a unit has also been removed - not convinced though, seems too small:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4428/36694806326_5262ba2df4_c.jpg)


Back outside - last remnants of matting on the NSF wing-top. I recall seeing this mentioned as an optional extra in a Carawagon brochure extract in Classic Land Rover - can't find that issue at the moment so forget what they called it. Chequer-plate Mk1, essentially! The vehicle in the brochure photo was only three registration numbers away from mine, so must have been from the same batch sent for conversion:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4336/35907591904_56a0c901f4_b.jpg)

Last thing - should a late 1968 IIA have screen washers? This set-up doesn't exactly look factory fitted, and the switch on the dash is of poor-quality bendy plastic, unlabelled too. Incidentally, they're one of the few things that still work - the others are the side lights, one tail light, and the horn:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4406/36694808166_a333bc951b_c.jpg)

I've ordered the first small batch of parts, to get the head together again. Will keep the updates coming.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Zuma on October 25, 2016, 05:19:07 pm
Thanks for posting the pictures. Always interesting to see 'before' pictures. The wiring is very........special.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Calum on October 26, 2016, 11:01:54 pm
All looking great! Engine looks quite happy for a 6. Valves etc. all looks as you'd expect for a well looked after engine in my opinion. If you are struggling for engine parts give John Wearing a call - Rover P4 specialists who usually have new old stock and genuine parts. My Carawagon has Labcraft fluorescent tubes inside, but I've converted them to LED internally now. Pretty certain they're the originals. The rubber on the front was called 'decking rubber' by Searle. Usually goes hard and brittle like yours has done. Cupboard behind the driver is indeed the wardrobe - mine has a steel rail in the top to hang clothes. Your missing cupboard is where my cooker is - sometimes a stove with fridge underneath lives here.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 27, 2016, 02:42:36 am
Thanks Calum - I'll re-assemble as-is then and see how it runs. As and when, I may well get some replacement parts in and store them until they're needed, as I suppose they're only going to get scarcer and more expensive.

If you don't mind, I'd like a good look over your own Carawagon at some point, as being of similar age to mine and having only one previous owner, it may well prove a good reference vehicle. I'll be aiming for as close to original spec as possible. Wiring in the back is of particular interest, as with the carnage that's going on in mine it may take some working out.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Horace109 on October 27, 2016, 07:26:14 am
The material on the bonnet is 'trac-mark' - a now obslete marine product.

I know where there is a source - in fact I have about a 10ft length of roll-width stuff in that colour...

If you want to replace it, give me a shout - there is a dwindling stock in a local boatyard to me, which I could get some...

Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 27, 2016, 10:19:46 am
Thanks, that's interesting. Do you know if they have it it any other colours? I'm not a tremendous fan of this dull pink version! If it's not too expensive, I'd possibly have some.

Thanks,

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Horace109 on October 27, 2016, 10:33:46 am
It used to be in a variety of colours - but hasn't been manufactured now for several years.

The stuff I have is the 'natural' colour - which is a light beige/brown colour. 

You can have it any colour you want - with some floor paint!

My boat has trac-mark covering beige - and it's painted grey.  You have to use a very tiny amount of paint, and work it in the pattern of the diamonds, so brush at a 45degree angle one way, then opposite.  You have to REALLY, REALLY scrub the paint out.  It's better to do two coats, where the first is patchy - than try and do one generous coat.

Otherwise the paint fills the pattern.

J
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 27, 2016, 10:44:19 am
Thanks - in that case, I'm definitely interested. If you're not too far away, I could come and collect - where about in the country is 'up the clump?'

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Calum on October 27, 2016, 06:09:02 pm
You're more than welcome whenever! Not a million miles away but might be an event we're both at or something? Other than that you can come and compare/take pics or whatever. They do seem remarkably similar vehicles! Mine even had the exact same roof rack with the alloy box section which I had never seen on another (though have heard mention of a few times). You seem to have the 'Ergo-Contoured' seats too, a Searle option of which I've never seen another set other than mine (most just seem to have standard Land Rover seats). By sheer coincidence, mine didn't have any spot lights on but I added some and they are the same Lucas ones that you have fitted, as are the MAP hubs I fitted..
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 28, 2016, 08:18:55 am
That'd be very useful - much appreciated! I'm hoping to make it to the Christmas Do in Norfolk - if you're in the Carawagon then, then that should do it. If not, then as you say, you're not too far away.

Horace109, I've noticed from your post in the Christmas Do thread that you're in Norfolk yourself. If I do make it down, that would seem an opportune time to pick up some trac-mark - would that work for you?

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Horace109 on October 28, 2016, 10:35:31 am
Hi Phil,

Yes of course. 

I am going to speak with the chap this weekend, PM me and then I will respond and let you know price - sharn't think it expensive.

J
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on November 02, 2016, 02:46:34 pm
Those who received Classic Land Rover today will find my Carawagon at the top of page 18. Bit of a surprise, that - they obviously keep an eye out for such things!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: hippydave on November 02, 2016, 09:38:32 pm
It looks nice, give them a ring and see if they may do an article on it.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on December 21, 2016, 04:23:51 am
Small update on this - there isn't too much to report, as the head strip-down has been followed by much slacking.

The largely un-planned for arrival of the Carawagon in the garage left us relying on a kindly neighbour's driveway for over-spill parking, so the priority has really been to find more permanent storage. As usual, I've been on the receiving-end of considerable undeserved luck and am able to use a relative's garage in the next town, in exchange for nothing more than the occasional odd job around the house.

The only draw-back is that the garage in question hasn't been adapted for Land Rovers, so the roof has had to come off - no qualms with that while it's not going anywhere. Having previously only removed the basic hard-top from my Series III, this was something of a saga by comparison - around five hours. The bonus of internal standing room did not go unappreciated. Taking my time paid off, as everything came apart without damage.

Immediately after arrival at its new home. Roof up for obligatory inspection by intrigued neighbours:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4391/35932253573_dc8519c489_b.jpg)

Wiring above the rear door was the first thing to come out - part of the scruffy job related to the aftermarket interior lighting:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4436/36571919372_d0ba843c45_b.jpg)

Why do a proper job when you can use duct tape? Previous owners have a lot to answer for:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4430/36345739150_f9caf5665f_b.jpg)

Screws holding the windscreen blind in place were rather reluctant to budge:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4342/36571927812_7f2af3e0fe_c.jpg)

Access to the roof bolts requires removal of aluminium trim all-round. The notch in this piece supports one end of the roof beds when they are in use:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4394/35932274583_d778f9decb_b.jpg)

Both roof beds are held in place along one side by a row of rivets. All came out:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4409/35932273163_a90310353c_b.jpg)

Trim above the side windows shares fixing rivets with the top window channels, which are accessed from the outside:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4411/35932277503_3a53d8912d_b.jpg)

'Paraphernalia Pockets' released from their fixings on each side:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4427/35907407384_f2ae6ab5df_b.jpg)

Roof trim removal revealed more wiring atrocities:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4357/35907406504_abb9d05348_b.jpg)

Trim mostly removed - looking quite bare:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4354/35907412524_c5d8dc4887_b.jpg)

Seat-belt mounting brackets had to come out to enable removal of the final two trim pieces:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4356/35907414834_f49a4a86c5_b.jpg)

Roof in its entirety finally free. Rather a lot heavier than a standard one:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4353/36694653066_358d30000b_b.jpg)

All finally squeezed into the garage. It's a reluctant roller, so considerable profanity was involved. Cardboard in place to take drips - eleven years of standing still hasn't seen-off all the EP90:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4346/36741726385_2ddb0058e2_b.jpg)

The plan now is still to get it initially running and driving, as pushing the stiff bugger in-and-out of the garage isn't something I want to be doing too often. It takes four people even on the flat, to give an idea. Then it'll be gradual removal and re-furbishment of parts, until I have a garage containing a drive-able chassis, and a pile of parts sorted and ready for re-assembly. When time and money allow, it'll then be temporarily back home for the full re-build - there is life in the original chassis, so if I still can't weld by that point, the forum will be receiving a call for aid. Once road-worthy, it'll be back to this garage - the medium-term plan will be to run the lifting roof in stripped-down form (no trim, paraphernalia pockets and roof beds), to allow it in-and-out without excessive dismantlement. The full set-up will have to wait until I have somewhere more suitable for storage. I'm trying not to get too excited here, as the timescale for all that probably runs into several years!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Zuma on December 21, 2016, 06:38:51 am
Well done! Good work! Keep us posted on progress.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: RMS on December 21, 2016, 08:28:46 pm
Nice write-up Phil - that wiring looks a lot like mine though   whstle

Cheers,
Robin.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Gossamer on December 22, 2016, 09:50:36 am
Stick with it, Phil.

One step at a time.

Please continue  theto share detailed photographs, they will be helpful in the future.

 lkebtn
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on December 22, 2016, 06:27:28 pm
Cheers all.

I've had a couple of comments about the most recent post being potentially useful to others - I think the fact things are being done just a bit at a time allows for more detail without Biblical posts. Always been one for detailed recording, though - the (pretty standard) Series III re-build finished with 1,543 photographs, so heaven knows how many this'll end up with!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Gossamer on December 22, 2016, 07:32:59 pm
Hi Phil.
Might I suggest edited highlights on here and beg access to the enormous stash of subtly different photos via dropbox or similar?

Sproggle and I looking for ideas to help rebuild Chantelle and a carawagon roof was our first thought, though plans may change if another opportunity becomes reality.

The way the interior is fashioned will be of great interest too.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on December 22, 2016, 08:12:38 pm
I'll sort that, yes - this'll remain as the general re-build thread, but I'll be doing a more conversion-specific one over on LRCC. Both will still be rather whittled-down, so as you suggest, I'll dump absolutely everything into an album (Photobucket) for others to access and sift through. Will let you know when all is up-and-running!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: steifbear on March 23, 2017, 09:35:48 pm
Any update on this Phil?
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on March 31, 2017, 08:44:43 am
Apologies, I've been all but completely inactive on the forums so far this year! In any case, the short answer is no, nothing's happened with it since moving to the other garage. For some reason I'm bloody knackered all the time at the moment and tend to just crash in the evenings, so my productivity has dropped right off!

What time I have spent in the garage has been dedicated to other vehicles; a new rear crank seal on the Series III after a claggy ford killed the last one (won't forget the flywheel housing drain plug again!), a gearbox re-build for a mate, and I'm half-way through sorting a cylinder head for another - just waiting for word from the machine shop. The Carawagon has rather been pushed to the back of the queue - the head has been in bits since October! Had a quick look at it one evening a few weeks back, and can say that the inlet valve stem seals are a pain to fit. They're internal o-rings. It might just be me, but I couldn't get even one to seat.

Must get that Photobucket album sorted!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on August 04, 2017, 04:59:31 pm
I see that in my long absence from the forum the bobbing rastards at Photobucket have utterly trashed this thread. £25 a month they want. Bieving thastards. In any case, there will actually be some Carawagon news soon, as I'll have a bit of time to start tinkering in the next few weeks. Today I dropped the stripped head off to have the valves properly de-coked and lapped-in, and the stem seals inserted - I never managed to have any success with getting those in myself! I'll have it back to re-assemble on Monday. Across the weekend I'm going to have a go at getting the clutch working, freeing the throttle linkage, and fitting a facet pump to bypass the original fuel system for the time being. Aim is to have it running and moving by the end of next week. I'll do my best to keep this up-to-date!

In the meantime, Flickr calls.

Phil


Bilfering pastards.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Gossamer on August 04, 2017, 05:08:42 pm
Welcome back, Poppet.

Same problem with the photo's on my threads.

Good luck with your fiddling.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on August 21, 2017, 01:20:31 am
Apologies Gossamer, I said I'd get an album sorted for you and others to use for ideas for your own camper conversions. Also to Robin, whose Classic Camper forum I have also neglected for too long. I have the organisational skills of a cabbage, unfortunately!

The idea of getting the Carawagon moving by the end of 'next week,' i.e. last week, hasn't gone to plan - as usual. These inlet valve stem seals are proving to be something of a problem. Not only can I not get them in, but neither can the chaps at my local garage, engine specialist, or a classic motorbike nut that the engine place asked to have a go. We've all managed to at least get some of them seated in the grooves correctly, but they immediately pop back out upon insertion of the valves. I may well ultimately have the guides machined to take external seals as found on the 2¼ engines, as this whole business is getting a bit ridiculous, and I don't fancy doing it again! I've ordered a fresh set of the standard o-ring type, just on the off-chance that those from the head gasket set I've got aren't quite the right size, but I think I'm clutching at straws.

Anyway, enough of that negativity. I have at least managed to get a few things removed and tidied-up in preparation for getting it running, so here we go - bonnet off, work begins:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4393/36654547726_fbe97857ae_b.jpg)

Engine bay as I left it back in October:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4376/36305340060_3786ca901f_b.jpg)

I'm going to set the exhaust valve clearances before trying to fire it up - access to the valve gear is much easier with the exhaust manifold removed. The brass nuts connecting it to the exhaust came away with no difficulty. There is a warranty card for a stainless steel exhaust in the history file, and judging by the lack of rust on the down-pipe, it appears to still be fitted. Bonus:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4395/36305342070_d2a1cc6b2f_b.jpg)

Exhaust manifold removed, also with alarming ease:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4388/36562279481_acfcb98a25_b.jpg)

Next to come off is the engine block side cover, below the exhaust ports:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4391/36654520746_29847781f5_b.jpg)

Side cover removed - there was only the faintest trace of oil left on the reverse, showing how thoroughly it's drained to the sump in the time the vehicle has been stood (twelve years, to re-cap!):
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4408/36531211062_106a641907_b.jpg)

Exhaust valve gear exposed. I haven't adjusted anything yet; I'll do that when I come to re-assemble the top-end:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4342/36531212422_5b57d781b1_b.jpg)

Inside to access the clutch pedal box bolts, which proved to be the first to offer any resistance to removal, so far:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4385/36531213712_f6a522b54b_b.jpg)

Clutch master cylinder. I managed to shoot myself in the chest with some jet-black fluid by accidentally compressing it when manoeuvring the pedal box out:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4432/36700464975_95e8583693_b.jpg)

Pedal box removed:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4366/36700465825_bc80dbecd9_b.jpg)

(https://live.staticflickr.com/4391/36700467535_bf6c39deb3_b.jpg)

I stopped there and brought the removed parts home with me to be tidied-up. Much de-greasing, wire-wheeling and spraying ensued. I just have the pedal box left to sort before taking them back to go back on.

Exhaust manifold painted with Plasti-Kote Wood Stove paint - thanks to Calum for that recommendation!:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4365/36531240132_c9d6539cb3_b.jpg)

Engine side cover, hydraulic fluid reservoir bracket, and various cylinder head brackets painted-up:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4386/36305375780_a263e588ed_b.jpg)

That's that for now. The next update will hopefully be to say that the inlet valve stem seals are finally in and the head's back together, so at the current rate, I'd suggest checking this thread somewhere around March 2028.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Gossamer on August 21, 2017, 10:48:29 am
Thanks.
Looking good.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: 94mharris on August 21, 2017, 01:01:06 pm
Looking really smart. Gonna sound great once you get the 6 pot going :) fnky
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on August 22, 2017, 08:46:46 pm
Tiny update - the air cleaner has been lurking in the garage since October, so that's had a go-over in addition to the parts I removed recently.

Before:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4388/35906865944_30eb8ded13_b.jpg)

After:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/4378/36571466902_58c92347f8_c.jpg)

I've decided recently that in contrast to the Series III, which was predominantly roller and brush-painted, absolutely everything on the Carawagon is going to be sprayed; I'm aiming for as close to 'pristine' as possible. Sorry, 'patina' people! Fear not, however - that certainly won't prevent it being using properly, come the time.

Would my pile of photographs still potentially be of use, Gossamer, or have things progressed with your own vehicle in the time I've been absent? I was going to sort through them properly, but will be happy to just indiscriminately lob them all into a Flickr album this week if they'd be any good to you.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on August 22, 2017, 09:32:53 pm
All previous posts in this thread now 'de-Photobucketed' and displaying correctly.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Gossamer on August 22, 2017, 10:20:15 pm
All photo's and comments/advice will be gratefully received.

Sproggle's 109 is still roughly where we left it in the spring.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on September 20, 2017, 08:13:42 pm
Flickr album is finally sorted - I've included every photo I have that shows some aspect of the camper conversion. The mechanical side of things I have omitted to save upload space. Obviously, all of that is standard IIA, so can be found in the usual manuals anyway.

https://www.flickr.com/gp/150923949@N04/8hr0v6 (https://www.flickr.com/gp/150923949@N04/8hr0v6)

It's not terribly thorough yet, but will be added to as I go along. If anyone would like extra/more detailed photos or measurements of anything in particular, let me know, and I'll see what I can get next time I'm over there.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on October 06, 2017, 12:23:13 am
A little more progress, then - actually from mid-September, but I've only just found the time to write it up. I've recently gone into my final year of university, so things are a tad 'ectic at present.

The valve stem seal conundrum was finally solved by Calum (who else?) during my brief appearance at t'pit. It turned out that the head had somehow been fitted with two sets of seals, so there was still a set in there even after I removed the first lot last October. How anyone managed to squeeze the second set in, I'll never know. I can't help but be rather embarrassed about missing that, but never mind - it's certainly not a mistake I'll be making again! Ten minutes with a pick and a matchstick (to prod the new seals in), and that was that. Thanks to turbo mick for the use of his tail-gate as an impromptu work-bench!

A bit more dismantlement took place before doing anything with the head. As previously mentioned, the clutch hydraulics are up for renewal, and I've concluded that access to the slave cylinder will be much easier with the gearbox tunnel out.

The heater needed removing first - secured by four screws, the top two of which are shared with the instrument panel. The holes for these are visible below:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4469/37489204492_2a6113582d_b.jpg)

The heater wires needed disconnecting from behind the dash, so I decided to have a quick look behind there while it was off. The wiring looks less bodged and generally terrifying than that in the rest of the vehicle:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4467/23668140038_8a24c6ddf2_b.jpg)

Following that, the heater just needed sliding out until the inlet and outlet pipes were clear of the bulkhead - visible here on the engine bay side:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4511/36851021113_333c2b8f6a_b.jpg)

Heater removed:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4509/37520198001_80ab87068f_b.jpg)

Following the removal of a few screws, the vinyl trim whatnot came away to reveal the gearbox tunnel to bulkhead fixings:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4510/23668136478_9b838f822c_b.jpg)

The six-pot gearbox tunnel arrangement differs from the four-cylinder version in that it sits on top of the two floor panels instead of beneath them, so it is, in theory, quicker to remove. I quickly encountered some thoroughly seized bolts, however, so thought 'bugger that for now' and moved on to the engine bay.

As I exited the cab, the driver's door top hinge broke, leaving the door just about clinging on:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4510/23668135388_49bc4d4f51_c.jpg)

Both top hinges are of the Series III type, as the previous owner decided to fit boingy mirrors. Thankfully he had the sense to keep hold of the original IIA ones - they'll be going back on pretty promptly.

I thought it would be sensible to check there was nothing potentially harmful residing in the sump, so that came off, with pleasing ease:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4457/37520196841_b51d59dc33_b.jpg)

Some serious 'fun' I've had cleaning that up. The oil filter housing and adaptor were removed too.

View of the crankshaft and engine block interior. I'm intrigued by the pale yellow paint colour - never seen that before. Is anyone familiar with it?:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4494/36851018363_7b07775433_c.jpg)

Oil strainer also came off for a clean. It's held in place by a small castle nut and split pin:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4489/37520195971_20cdf6c943_c.jpg)

Back home then - inlet valves finally going back into the head. The engine at the left of the photo is a straight-six from a Rover P4 105 - its head takes twin SUs, and may well find its way into the Carawagon, eventually:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4459/36810064374_a8284f971e_b.jpg)

Rockers back in:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4466/23668129258_66a4f50849_b.jpg)

The most drawn-out head re-build in the history of mankind, finally complete:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4490/36851016213_5bb00dbdaa_b.jpg)

Various brackets re-fitted:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4492/36851015553_e7db5b7ea2_b.jpg)

It's important to remember the o-ring for the water pump connection:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4500/37489206562_12405f5b08_b.jpg)

Head dropped back on. I enjoy the colour contrast with the still sludge-coated block:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4480/37472122366_de6ff0f091_b.jpg)

That pretty well brings things up to date. The clutch pedal box, sump, and oil filter housing are currently in the process of being tidied-up, so once they're done I'll find a free weekend to throw everything back together, set the valve clearances etc., and see what, if anything, happens when I turn the key.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Lo-Fi on October 07, 2017, 10:41:18 pm
Nice progress! Can't help chuckling at the valve stem seals...
I've just torn down a Rover P4 block, which is supposedly the same. Familiar internal paint (in the valve chest too), but the crank webs and main caps look very different. I've still got my Land Rover block to dismantle, so it'll be interesting to see what the differences are side by side.
Good luck with firing it up.

Ian
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on December 19, 2017, 01:42:07 am
Thanks Ian - it looks like the yellow paint was standard for many P4 six-pots, as I've found a couple of brochure illustrations showing the same colour. Never seen one this colour in a Land Rover before - think they're usually blue-grey. I've had a read of your own IIA thread - the P4 block you stripped looks to be an earlier 2,638cc type, as opposed to the 2,625cc version used in 109"s. If so, this likely accounts for the dissimilar crank etc. Calum will no doubt have something to say if I'm incorrect, however! Must say, I wish I had your fabrication skills - Pete was spot-on in saying the SW is in the best possible hands. I can think of a certain Carawagon about which the same definitely cannot be said!


The aforementioned brochure illustrations, for reference:

Rover 90 2,638cc engine (image found here: http://home.ican.net/~magnet/p4/engine1.jpg):
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4685/25278073438_c542d42095_c.jpg)

Rover 110 2,625cc 'Weslake' engine. Unusually the head is shown painted too. (image found here: https://i.pinimg.com/736x/8c/8b/39/8c8b39772482f02d07a097a048915144--brochure-html.jpg):
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4690/38262940675_8291b0e1e1_b.jpg)


No progress to report on the Carawagon front, sadly - it's still at the point I left it in September. My sporadic workshop sessions have lately been dedicated to getting a mate's Series III back on the road after dropping a valve. It's been one of those affairs where you begin taking things apart only to find layer-upon-layer of other problems. I'm sure we've all been there!


What I have got are some photographs from a couple of owners back - they're from around 1990, on the Isle of Wight. Corrosion aside, not a lot appears to have changed since then - the addition of the LPG system, and replacement of what looks like a cubby-box with a centre seat are the only particularly noticeable things.

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4732/38262959155_d97397b645_h.jpg)

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4738/39144632031_5c21f8464c_h.jpg)

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4691/39144631761_e02af3e9a6_h.jpg)

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4682/39144631281_35486f3d34_h.jpg)

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4598/38262960165_d38f5bd40f_h.jpg)

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4596/39144630641_7dd53246a5_h.jpg)

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4639/38262960485_3eba92e304_c.jpg)

That's those, then - with a bit of luck, I may actually get something done again over Christmas!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Land Raver on December 19, 2017, 09:51:08 pm
Nice photos!
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: James109 on December 20, 2017, 08:10:47 am
Really like those photos, there's something about photos on film! The wagon looks like it was well loved then too!
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on May 26, 2018, 08:03:34 am
Morning all,

Following the usual long period of inactivity, a modicum of progress has occurred - mostly in the form of a distributor re-build. I'd never done one before, so it was an educational experience for me, at least. This will likely be a rather long post, in which very little actually happens - the Star Wars: The Jast Jedi of Land Rover forum posts, if you like. Moderately more exciting updates may follow in the coming days.

Distributor as removed, less cap, rotor arm (which was cracked), and vacuum unit. Lucas model no. 41227A, June 1968 date-stamp:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/894/41454939795_fbb5a2a9b4_b.jpg)

Internal gubbins: contact breaker points, condenser and LT lead:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1745/41634454884_2d2c71bbc7_b.jpg)

Internal gubbins removed, aside from the rather sorry-looking wire at the bottom of the photo, which I assume is an earth:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1726/41454939275_037672496c_b.jpg)

Contact breaker moving plate and base plate removed to reveal the centrifugal advance unit:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/893/41454935345_cdb77a000d_b.jpg)

Once the two springs are removed, along with the screw retaining the cam, the cam can be lifted out (noting the position of the rotor arm slot relative to the distributor driving dog) to reveal the action plate, which sounds tremendously exciting:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1748/41634454254_0b4523bb9d_b.jpg)

Centrifugal advance weights shown at the opposite extremes of their travel:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1730/41454938875_be6bd9c515_c.jpg)

Next to be removed are the driving dog and thrust washer, requiring this locating pin to be driven out:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/877/41634453324_5067af4a9c_c.jpg)

The main distributor shaft can then be pressed (or driven) out:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1728/41634452984_42012b4299_c.jpg)

Shaft and action plate removed:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/882/41454937865_06f2dfc190_c.jpg)

A plastic distance collar sits on the shaft below the action plate:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/901/41634452534_5d90863955_b.jpg)

All parts were then given a good going-over with a brass brush before being, in an unprecedented moment of organisation, placed in a box for re-assembly the following day:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1760/41454937205_503380da47_b.jpg)

Earth lead replaced, with a bit of the original loom from my Series III (for the screen-wash motor, I think!):
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1747/41634451654_29840cb08a_b.jpg)

Distributor shaft being pressed back into place, following a liberal smear of moly grease:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1728/41634451184_c5542bc0d7_c.jpg)

Driving dog and thrust washer re-fitted:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1738/41634450934_e827254a37_b.jpg)

Cam and centrifugal advance unit back in place, weight contact surfaces also smeared with moly grease:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/877/41634450684_4b70e04b55_b.jpg)

Base and contact breaker moving plates re-fitted. The little post down at the right is where the vacuum advance spring attaches:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1759/41634450264_d6a2a6e851_b.jpg)

LT lead re-fitted, alongside new points and condenser. Yes, I do have a safety pin in place of a missing button on my shirt:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1760/41634449984_d018b3db6f_b.jpg)

The adjusting nut for the vacuum unit is kept at the correct setting by a coil spring and a small leaf spring, which has a central bump to allow it act as a ratchet:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1730/41454935915_4136aae095_b.jpg)

Vacuum unit and rotor arm fitted:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1750/41634449444_b1c44fdafe_b.jpg)

Cap clamps and cap fitted:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1748/41634449124_a421525352_b.jpg)

Clamping plate fitted; just about ready to go (needs an o-ring in the groove below the clamping plate). For interest I've paired it with the distributor from a 1958 Rover P4 105 (from which I have the engine). Rather a reduction in size appears to have occurred in the intervening ten years:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1759/41634448604_281eaf849d_b.jpg)

With that complete, I now know what the inside of a distributor looks like, but still can't really say how most of it works - centrifugal advance and vacuum units especially. Some reading required!


Now over to the garage where the Carawagon is currently stored. I've been slowly adding boxes of refurbished parts. No idea how I came by the Marks and Spencer one - I'm nowhere near posh enough to shop there:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1751/40550790750_4d8e8e8ddc_b.jpg)

Unfortunately, the main aim of my visit was not actually to make any progress, but to remove the overdrive, which I'm temporarily loaning to the Series III while its own is re-built. The latter, after three years of near total silence, has recently decided not only to do its best Ju-87 'Stuka' impression, but also to rattle loudly once warm, which is a tad concerning.

So here we are - nice and sludgy:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1742/41455976145_ea5711bb34_b.jpg)

Thought I'd look for the gearbox number while I was in there. Looks good for being the original, to the best of my knowledge:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1744/40550789770_19fb953069_b.jpg)

Mostly came away no trouble. The only exception was the pin linking the lever link-rod to the selector shaft, whose split-pin was rusted fast and required filing level on both sides:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1749/41455975295_39eec7182f_b.jpg)

Overdrive coupling sleeve revealed:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1743/40550788740_39e1e22ccb_b.jpg)

Removing that took rather a lot longer than it ought to have done, as the clutch slave cylinder was seized in the dis-engaged position, leaving the gearbox mainshaft spinning freely. Much faffing later, I discovered that the clutch could be engaged by levering a crow-bar against the front prop-shaft and clutch actuating lever to push the slave cylinder back into place. The mainshaft nut then unscrewed easily, allowing the overdrive coupling sleeve to slide out.


While in the cab, I noticed this faint pencil writing on the dash: '96 Radio Solent.' Presumably the owner's local station from its days on the Isle of Wight!:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/881/42310078822_0682b60d01_b.jpg)


Now for a tiny bit of progress. Engine oil strainer re-fitted:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1725/42309451652_0d324ca5b3_c.jpg)

Sump ready to go on, now free of the half-inch depth of grey gunge it arrived with:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1757/40550791900_65e9967bd4_b.jpg)

Sump fitted. Strangely, the two bolts into the bottom of the timing cover are UNC, while the rest are UNF:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1755/40550791320_72abe1c783_c.jpg)

Probably its first new oil filter since 2004:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1740/41635371774_565ba0d17d_b.jpg)

Oil filter housing fitted:
(https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1750/40550792750_c033f7facf_c.jpg)

A load of 20W/50 was lobbed in, before wrapping-up for the day. Heading over again this morning to sort tappet clearances etc. With a bit of luck, it might just be running soon. I said that in 2016, however!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Gossamer on May 26, 2018, 10:02:24 am
Very clever, well done.

I was chuffed to put a battery on charge this morning.

 lkebtn lkebtn
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Lo-Fi on May 27, 2018, 11:16:24 pm
Lovely write up! I've just rebuilt my six pot dizzy - same model. I'd highly recommend throwing the points in the bin (where they belong IMHO!) and fitting a Powerspark electronic kit, though. I've been running one in my V8 for many years now, and just put one on the six pot. I'll never go back to mechanical points, short of some kind of thermonuclear apocalypse that destroys everything electronic.

Keep the updates coming!
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on November 24, 2018, 12:40:06 am
As usual, I've been unable to put much work into the Carawagon in recent months, but I'll bring this thread up to date with what little has occurred.

Ian: I'm with you on the Powerspark front - I just bunged some new points in there to get things going for the time being, as there were multiple new sets in a toolbox that came with the vehicle. I put a Powerspark kit on the 2.5 in my 88" some time ago, and it's been very much a 'fit and forget' affair.  Any progress to report with your own six-pot? We appear to be similarly sporadic with our updates!

Next up on the far-longer-than-hoped-for road to getting the engine running was a carburettor rebuild. I'll run through this in far less detail than the distributor, in an attempt to avoid being monumentally dull. I do have photographs of practically every stage of the operation, so on the off chance anyone needs to see anything in particular, feel free to let me know. The carb. in question is a Zenith-Stromberg 175CD-2S, which I believe is standard for Land Rover six-pots. I was initially unsure about this, as there's a note in the history file describing a chance encounter between the 9th (then current) and 2nd owners: 'He (2nd owner) put the Stromberg carb on - 25mpg on the road, 15mpg round town!' I'll believe those figures when I see them! There's no mention of what the Stromberg supposedly replaced, unfortunately.

Anyway, here's the fellow in question in as-removed state:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4869/46018693301_d26109e765_b.jpg)

Removal of the top cover reveals a rubber diaphragm, piston and piston return spring, all of which can be lifted out:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4918/45108205425_324fb6494a_b.jpg)

Float chamber removed. Whoever was in there last had refitted the floats upside-down, oddly:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4912/46018692511_e26f189c94_b.jpg)

The aluminium body parts all cleaned up quite nicely, though I wasn't too fussy. As usual, clearing the crud from everything was by far the most time-consuming job in the rebuild:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4825/45107225445_f346db2249_b.jpg)

Having cleaned and inspected everything, I was pleased to conclude that nothing needed replacing beyond the gaskets and a few screws. New genuine gasket sets are still readily available:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4840/32147971768_297a136fa2_c.jpg)

Cold start assembly going back together. Interestingly, this has two settings, one each for starting above and below -18°C. Antarctic expedition, anyone?:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4873/45107225825_5509c81a90_b.jpg)

Steel levers etc. refitted after painting. Originally these were anodised, however this had worn through and they had begun to rust:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4903/45107226045_9c2b3bf76a_b.jpg)

New stainless screws for the top cover and float chamber - the originals had worn heads from previous work. These are from Ebay, sold as being for a Sunbeam Alpine:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4915/45107226575_9a21f92637_b.jpg)

Floats refitted the correct way up!:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4896/45107226325_4b119460ee_b.jpg)

New diaphragm. Locating tabs on the underside keep the piston in the correct orientation once fitted:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4862/45107226795_f68fd30fd0_b.jpg)

Adjusting the main jet to avoid interference with the metering needle allows the piston to return smoothly:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4834/45107227185_7a8afa935f_b.jpg)

Complete carb. ready to go again. Another small step closer:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4824/45107224295_5fc2a887d3_b.jpg)


Now briefly over to the rest of the vehicle! Tappet adjustment on the cards:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4895/45969150722_361638a4f0_c.jpg)

Inlet valves are of the overhead type, so sorting these was a familiar process - just 'rule of seven' rather than 'rule of nine' as on a four-cylinder engine:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4809/45969150242_9da1bfa12e_c.jpg)

Side exhaust valves were a new one for me, but the process is essentially the same. Just a bit more faff involved in keeping a screwdriver in place on the adjusting screws, especially on the rear cylinders:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4909/45107223175_85921ec530_b.jpg[img])

I left with the engine bay looking like this - rocker covers and exhaust manifold refitted:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4825/45107222885_6be307c28e_b.jpg)

That brings things up to date then. Just the distributor, carb. and a fuel pump to go on, then hopefully I'll have some more exciting news!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: hippydave on November 24, 2018, 11:12:04 am
 ;D Phil, you do know a video is required of the first start or it never happened.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: Lo-Fi on November 25, 2018, 04:58:54 pm
Sadly not much, I've been too busy moving house :( once I've got it all sorted I can start getting stuff cleaned up and looking pretty, though. I have a lot more space to work in now!

Great update! How soon can you fire it up?!?
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on November 26, 2018, 10:19:52 pm
Dave: Right you are! I'll be sure to do that if I can work out how to post a video on here!

Ian: Fair enough - at least you have a proper excuse! I'd like to say I'll have it all together and ready to fire some time this week, but that's probably optimistic, knowing me. Perhaps the week after!


Just a quick bit of potential interest - the Carawagon has this dealer plate fitted to the rear:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4903/45151689805_802678f419_b.jpg)

I did a bit of reading a while back, and found that the garage in question was owned and operated by John Coombs, known for prepping Jaguars to race spec in the 50s and 60s. The garage buildings still stand, on the A3 into Guildford, though now divided into smaller business units. I know from some notes in the history file that the Carawagon's second owner bought it in Guildford, so I presume it was sold from Coombs's as nearly new. Clearly it didn't travel all that far from Sunbury-on-Thames in its early years! I've just today become aware of a second Land Rover with an identical plate (a 1972 Series III 88"), but can't find any other references to their dealings with Land Rovers, which seems odd considering they must have sold a fair number to have gone to the effort of producing a plate specifically for them. Might be nice to pay the site a visit when the Carawagon's finally back on the road, in any case.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: LostInFrance on November 27, 2018, 04:15:10 pm
Very Nice Project !!

Seen & transported much worse so you have a good project.

Replacing woodwork will be on the list though...
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on November 28, 2018, 06:05:26 pm
LostInFrance: Cheers, and yes, it's really not that bad, all things considered. If I were to simply attack the chassis, bulkhead, brakes and electrics, it could probably be made roadworthy without all that much trouble. Given the use I plan to get out of it though, I'd rather go through the lot so I know everything's been done properly and won't need overly regular repairs.

The woodwork will definitely be on the list, as you say. I had to move the roof about recently to allow the side window in the garage to be replaced, and things deteriorated further in the process, so it's worse now than it appears in the photos on this thread.

I think the hinged end sections of the roof itself are good enough to reuse, as they've been well protected by the aluminium above them:
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4889/45179484075_01d4d1cc5c_b.jpg)

Everything else is well gone. Both of the painted pieces that the roof clamps down to when collapsed have fallen off completely now, so I've put a ratchet strap around the entire roof to hold what's left together for the time being!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: steifbear on February 09, 2020, 04:52:10 pm
Now then Phil, how’s the Carawagon looking?
Just a quick one, Does you motor have the gas bottle storage brackets?

Pete-with-a-V
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on February 11, 2020, 02:47:03 pm
Still firmly in the 'not a lot happening' camp I'm afraid, Pete!  I did get as far as banging everything together and attempting to start it a while back, but found there was no spark from the distributor.  Perhaps fitting a Britpart condenser of unknown age was a poor idea - who'd have thought?  I've now gone with Ian's approach and 'Powersparked' it; yet to be re-fitted, however.  Aiming to have another go next week.

The gas bottle brackets are absent, unfortunately; they presumably came a cropper when the LPG tanks (to be ditched) went in at the back.  Original stove also absent, so I'll eventually have a decision about what sort to fit.  I think it had the fold-down type on the rear door, originally.

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: RMS on February 11, 2020, 08:24:32 pm
One of mine has the carriers   fnky

I'm going to make some copies for the ones missing from my other Carawagons, but make them a little wider for Calor bottles.

Are you wanting one Pete?

Robin.
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on November 18, 2020, 04:33:45 pm
Very brief update: I finally refitted the distributor today (now 'Powersparked,' you may recall) and with that it started immediately on the first attempt.  Exhaust gases are clear, idle speed is about right, and overall it sounds quite happy.  I've no idea how to post a video on here though, so you'll just have to believe me until I've worked that one out!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: PCB93 on November 21, 2020, 11:40:13 am
Right, let's see if this works:

https://live.staticflickr.com/video/50627736113/f7f1556fda/360p.mp4?s=eyJpIjo1MDYyNzczNjExMywiZSI6MTYwNTk2MTIwOSwicyI6Ijk1ZDc0ZjE2ODE5MjNhZjk4NzE3Mzc5ZjFmMjZmNTQ3NmQ4OWE5NmIiLCJ2IjoxfQ

I managed to miss recording the actual moment of starting, as to be honest I still wasn't convinced it'd be in the mood!  Proof it does run, in any case.  It's occurred to me now that the last time I tried the issue may just have been that the ignition timing was too far out, rather than any fault with the distributor; the timing pointer was absent so I just had to guess where to aim for.  This time I brought the pointer from the flywheel housing of the Rover 105 engine I have, which is clearly of the same type.  Set it at exactly TDC and it fired immediately, as I say.

The current 'fuel tank' setup is rather rudimentary; just an old leaky facet pump bodged into the cab and with the inlet hose stuck into the open neck of a jerry-can:
(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50628366836_6ef774866b_c.jpg)

Not sure that'll put me in line for any 'services to health and safety' awards, but it works for now.  The original fuel pump is unresponsive and there's still half a tank of petrol from 2005-ish to get rid of before I can link something more sensible in.  Granted, all it'll have to do in this state is drive closer to the road for loading onto a recovery truck for the journey home, after which the full strip-down will begin; just need to get the clutch operational for that.  This project will finally be kicking off in earnest in the new year!

Phil
Title: Re: 1968 Series IIA Carawagon
Post by: mickandpaula101 on November 21, 2020, 08:42:56 pm
Not sure but that fuelling mod  looks like a genuine land roverr optional extra.seenandused by all here